My Recent Findings-Brain Bleeding


Recently in my internet explorations I came acrossed a little boy named Eli who has suffered a brain bleed (my own personal worst nightmare). He received surgery and is now recovering. The most warming part of this story has been seeing the photo of his mama finally being able to hold him. Since reading about Eli I realized that brain bleeding isn’t something that I was really told about. Of course its been mentioned in passing and I’ve known that it could happen to my own little boy but I’ve never before taken the time to read about the signs and possible outcomes of a brain bleed.

Symptoms include

  • irritability
  • swelling of the head
  • irregular breathing
  • sleepiness
  • a headache suddenly followed by vomiting
  • seizures
  • a lack of response.

I’m sure there are more symptoms but I didn’t happen to come acrossed them. Sometimes it takes a few days to see the signs of a brain bleed because there isn’t enough pressure on the brain to cause a noticeable problem. Your HTC can give you their procedure for a situation such as this but personally I would notify Anthony’s doctor while en route to our children’s hospital. Brain bleeding can be caused by a vaginal delivery during birthing, a fall, a traumatic head injury, and of course it can be spontaneous.

Most importantly, and I can’t stress this enough, if you want to know all the information on this do some research or ask someone who has a degree that qualifies them to talk about a medical condition…like your doctor.

PREVENT!

Children should be wearing a helmet during activities such as but not limited to skateboarding, bike riding, roller blading, horseback riding. You get the point! Often times your local hemophilia foundation will help you get a helmet and pads for children who are still toddling to wear around the house during playtime. Should definitely get into contact with local chapter and ask about safety options for children.

We are families with children. We should be aware enough to make life safe for them. Theres a lot to learn but luckily we live in a time that has made the world smaller and information a whole lot easier to come by. Take advantage of the resources out there and let’s make these kids have the best childhood possible.

Get your girls tested! When I was little we all thought hemophilia hadn’t continued in the family, that is until a cousin was born with it. Still my mother felt like we were safe. Then I had a son with it. They tested Anthony TWICE before they were certain that he was severe factor 9 deficiency and yet they let Michael off the hook with only one test (which they weren’t able to get enough blood for as the prescription required) Be fierce! YOU are the parent, YOU are the customer. Within reason of course! You need to make sure that all the needs you have for you child are met. Have a question? Ask it. Have a concern? Voice it! You don’t have the luxury of being a quiet soul when it comes to medical care. My last bit of advice is to build a support system. EVEN IF YOU DON’T HAVE FAMILY! Get out there and bring people close to you. Sometimes you just need someone to help pick up that extra slack that a child, any child, brings.

Of course there can be complications of a brain bleed both long-term and short-term. I won’t pretend to know all of them. I do know that my own cousin suffered bleeding to the brain after a car accident (this led to us discovering his hemophilia) he now has limited short-term memory. I hear that after a brain bleed you are more likely to have more brain bleeds. I’m sure this varies per case but any questions should be directed to your HTC.

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